puffs kickstarter

Genuinely Fake: When Fans Make Parodies That Mean Something

(I’m going to go on a tangent about Star Trek. Bear with me.)

There’s been a complaint, recently, about the new Star Trek series, Star Trek: Discovery. Actually, there have been a lot of complaints, but one of the real head-scratchers has been that The Orville, the parody TV show created by Seth McFarlane, feels more “Star Trek” than Discovery. While Discovery is certainly a departure from the usual Trek formula, it seems…a bit much, to decide that the parody is the more “real” creation.

Revisiting Corus: Nawat

In the Revisiting Corus series, I’ve been revisiting all of Tamora Pierce’s stories set in the Tortall universe. Today, I’ll be talking about the short story “Nawat,” which follows up the Trickster duet.

Note: I will be taking a break from this series over the Christmas/New Year’s break. The first post on the Provost’s Dog series will be debuting on January 12th.

From a crow point of view, to childbirth, to disability, Tamora Pierce is tackling a lot of subjects in this short story that we haven’t seen her tackle before.

artemis review

REVIEW: Artemis by Andy Weir

Andy Weir exploded onto the literary scene with The Martian, a book that had such huge crossover appeal that Matt Damon played its protagonist in the film version. Sci-fi and fantasy books that have crossover appeal are becoming less rare, but Weir’s grounded, tech-explanations-heavy, roller coaster ride is unique–it’s one of those books that’s uniquely perfect in execution. It contains within itself a perfect beginning, that by necessity maintains drama and heart–even a middlingly good writer could make that work. Weir is more than middlingly good, and so the book absolutely soars. Everyone I know who’s read it cried at least once.

So the big question is, can his next novel live even halfway up to that standard? The Martian was so massively good that it was hard to expect something that perfectly done, but going into Andy Weir’s new novel, Artemis, is the real test of whether Andy Weir will be able maintain the loyalty he’s gained from so many fans.

trickster

Revisiting Corus: Trickster’s Queen

In this recurring review series, I’ve been going over every Tortall book Tamora Pierce ever wrote in preparation for the newest book in the Tortall world, Tempests and Slaughter, which will be out in February. For this post, we will be going over the second book in the Trickster’s duet, Trickster’s Queen.

This book. Thiiiiiiis boooooooooooooook.

trickster

Revisiting Corus: Trickster’s Choice

In this series, I’m reviewing every book Tamora Pierce ever set in Tortall. In this post, that book will be Trickster’s Choice, the first of the two books in the Trickster’s Duet.

Oh, Aly. My feelings are complicated about you. On the one hand, you’re a really excellent book. On the other hand, your handlings of colonialism…are weird.

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Revisiting Corus: Lady Knight

In this series I’m rereading Tamora Pierce’s Tortall books. This post is about the fourth book in the Protector of the Small quartet, Lady Knight.

This is my favorite Tamora Pierce book, hands-down.

photosets

Photosets: How fans are using Photoshop and screenshots to create a new art form on Tumblr

There’s a unique art form that blossomed on a unique social platform, spurred by the unique way fandom democratizes art. Photosets, edits, or photomanips–they go by all those names, and yet many other things do, too–rose as a way for fandom to express itself beyond the bounds of fanart or fanfiction, and the aesthetic sensibilities that have risen from them have had wide-ranging implications on fandom on Tumblr.

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Revisiting Corus: Squire

In this series, I’m revisiting all of Tamora Pierce’s Tortall books in order. In this post, I’m talking about the third book in the Protector of the Small quartet, Squire.

 

Again, one of Pierce’s favorite subjects is the transition from child to adult, and that is the underlying thrust of Squire.

star trek discovery

Star Trek Discovery Review: Season 1, Part 1

Star Trek Discovery finished up premiering the first half of its first season this Sunday; the second half will come in January. But now that we’ve received a complete narrative arc, it’s a convenient time to look back on the half-season and reflect on what we’ve seen so far. I ended up opting not to do weekly recaps of this show; for one, I was busy, and for two, it’s such a season-narrative type show that it felt like I was attempting to review an unfinished project. I wasn’t decided on how exactly I felt about the show, which is a little contrary to, well, reviewing something.

I’m not sure I have a definitive opinion on the show, but I do have some thoughts. (No spoilers, unless you count vague plot references as spoilers.)

a spy's guide

Revisiting Corus REVIEW: Tortall: A Spy’s Guide

Revisiting Corus is normally a series of posts reviewing the books set in the Tortall universe. However, Tortall: A Spy’s Guide just came out on October 31st, so we’ll be interrupting our scheduled posts to review it!

I didn’t really know what to expect going into this; all of the pithy online descriptions call it “a great gift for Tortall fans!” Which gives the impression that it’s more of a fanbook than a book, without anything new to offer. It’s also presented in a library binding style (cover printed directly onto a hardback surface), which is generally done with these sorts of ancillary books. These types of books have become popular: There’s Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Ultimate Guide, The TARDIS Handbook and Sherlock: The Casebook, among many, many others. These books are generally smaller and cheaper than art books or making-of chronicles, and are written in-universe, with characters compiling files for one reason or another.